THANKSGIVING CHALLENGE: Sight Translation of Police Report  

Here’s a little sight translation to get into the spirit of Thanksgiving.  Pull out your audio recorder, phone, or tablet and record yourself sight translating the police report below into a non-English language. Remember, standard procedure is to spend two or three minutes reviewing the document before rendering it to prepare your brain for the linguistic challenge.  When you listen to your rendition, listen for content – did you get all the concepts? Does it sound identical to the original? How about your style – was it a smooth delivery?  Did you have many pauses?  Did you add “ums” or “uhs”? Did you sound confident and professional?  And how did you handle the tricky terms? Did you freeze or did you come up with an on-the-spot solution?

PRACTICE, LEARN, AND HAVE FUN!!!

Oh!  And check out our Holiday sale at www.TheConfidentInterpreter.com

POLICE REPORT: THANKSGIVING DAY DV ALTERCATION 

On November 28, 2019, our unit responded to a call at 2245 W. Doomed Turkey Lane regarding a domestic disturbance.  Upon arrival, Officer Pavofeo and I heard loud voices coming from inside the dwelling. Before we approached the front door, a woman who appeared to be middle aged came running out.  She appeared to be agitated – she was speaking loudly and rapidly and was flinging her arms about as she ran toward us.  She was uttering things like, “Thank God you’re here!  They’re going to kill each other! Continue reading “THANKSGIVING CHALLENGE: Sight Translation of Police Report  “

The Interpreter as Word Detective: Easy tips to improve your vocabulary    By Yvette Citizen, FCCI

Dedicated to our colleagues in Fiji

As interpreters, we must always strive to maintain our languages at equal levels.  This is why we must become ‘word detectives’, investigating every term that comes our way and asking ourselves if we have equivalents in all our working languages.  Here’s an exercise that will not take up too much time out of your busy life but will help you expand your vocabulary.  Take on the role of a linguistic Sherlock Holmes – cap, pipe, and spyglass are optional.

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JOHN BICHSEL RETIRES FROM NATIONAL CENTER FOR INTERPRETATION by Yvette Citizen

 

It’s been officially announced!  John Bichsel, Curriculum and Testing Specialist, is retiring from The University of Arizona’s National Center for Interpretation @uofanci.  John started working at NCI back in 1986 when his academic advisor, Dr. Roseann Dueñas Gonzalez, hired him while he worked on his Masters in ESL. Throughout that period he took leave a few times – once to spend a year traveling in South America and another to serve a two-year Fulbright stint in Mexico – but upon return each time he continued collaborating with Dr. Gonzalez, Victoria Vazquez, Paul Gatto, and the rest of the NCI team to champion equal access for limited- and non-English speakers by developing interpreter quality training curricula and assessment instruments, a mission he continues to be very passionate about.  These are a few accomplishments during his tenure at NCI:      Continue reading “JOHN BICHSEL RETIRES FROM NATIONAL CENTER FOR INTERPRETATION by Yvette Citizen”

SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION: A GUIDE FOR SELF-STUDY

  • SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION: A GUIDE FOR SELF-STUDY

Yvette Citizen, FCCI

Many of you are either aspiring interpreters in need of training, or practicing interpreters who need to hone their skills in order to pass a certification exam.  To that end, The Confident Interpreter has prepared a brief guide to help you in your self-study program.   Here are a few tips to a good self-guided practice:

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Prison Terms

It’s impossible to work as a court interpreter and not be exposed to terminology specifically related to prisons – whether it’s legal code pertaining to prison sentences or the daily expressions used inside prisons.  We’ve compiled a list of them.  Count how many you’re familiar with and have equivalents for in your working languages.   Let us know how you scored!

Continue reading “Prison Terms”